TAKE STEPS TO HELP SUPPORT LOVED ONES

 More than 95,000 South Carolinians live with Alzheimer’s disease, an illness that impairs a person’s cognitive functions.

In addition to those suffering, nearly 200,000 individuals throughout our state are responsible for caring for their loved ones who are experiencing Alzheimer’s and other dementiarelated illnesses. Luckily there are resources available throughout our community to raise awareness and provide support to both Alzheimer’s patients and their families, who are dealing with the daily realities of the disease.

ANGIE GILLESPIE HELPS PATIENTS NAVIGATE BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSIS

No one wants an abnormal mammogram. Not only can it mean one may be facing the dreaded “C” word, but you feel like you are standing on the precipice of the unknown. 

But thanks to Angie Gillespie, a certified breast imaging navigator and market lead mammography technologist at Hilton Head Regional Healthcare, those diagnosed with breast cancer are not alone. 

Hailey Niclaus was just 3 years old when she succumbed to childhood leukemia. Her strength still inspires

There is little more terrible darkness than when a parent loses a child. Those who have children know the animal instinct with which we protect our young, and the extraordinary lengths we will go to keep them safe. When that protection simply isn’t enough, when a monstrous force like childhood leukemia proves insurmountable, it can be devastating. 

SENIOR LIVING TIPS TO FIND THE BEST LEVEL OF CARE IN THE GOLDEN YEARS

The idea of senior care has evolved in the last few decades, encompassing a wealth of options as diverse as the seniors who live them. Opportunities abound, whether that means continuing to live in your own home or taking advantage of more specialized care to suit your particular medical needs. 

Options include assisted and independent living options that truly make your golden years shine. 

HEALTH SCREENINGS FIND PROBLEMS BEFORE THEY START

health

We all need to have regular health screenings to make sure we are healthy. Having regular health exams and tests can help find problems before they start, and they can help find problems early, when your chances for treatment and a cure are better. 

GUIDELINES TO HELP KEEP YOUR SKIN SAFE

sunscreen

It’s clear that excessive exposure to the sun increases the risk of skin cancer and premature aging of the skin, yet general knowledge about sunscreens — how they work, how much to use, and what brands are safe — seems to be a bit hazy. 

Here are a few guidelines to increase your sunscreen know-how and help you make better decisions about protecting your skin.

TIPS FOR PEOPLE WHO SIT FOR LONG HOURS

Sitting for a long period of time, whether it’s in the office or at home, can work against a person’s health in the long run. Ultimately, it may increase your risk for weight gain, heart disease, joint pain and diabetes, and it may also affect your posture.

HERE’S WHY IT BENEFITS YOUR OVERALL HEALTH

vitamind

If you’re looking for a reason to enjoy some time in the sun, call it “getting your vitamin D.” Five to 10 minutes a day, two to three times a week, can help your body create the vitamin D it needs. Technically, vitamin D is a pro-hormone. (Vitamins are nutrients that you primarily receive through diet.) Here’s why vitamin D is so important:

medicine

The practice of holistic medicine integrates conventional and alternative therapies to prevent and treat disease and to promote optimal health. The use of such therapies is increasing, according to recent studies. 

hearthealth

TIPS TO LOWER THE RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR PROBLEMS

While you can’t change your family history of heart disease, there is still a lot you can do to lower your risk of developing cardiovascular problems.

“The first step to take control of your heart health is to contact your primary care physician,” says Dr. Stephen Fedec, a board-certified cardiologist at Beaufort Memorial Heart Specialists in Okatie and Beaufort. “Determine if you have risk factors for heart disease. If you do, make necessary lifestyle modifications to reduce that risk.”