Hilton Head Island Magazine and News

STONEWORKS GIVES BACK TO DEEP WELL PROJECT

Deep Well Project received a $500 check from StoneWorks from proceeds of StoneWorks’ winter Level porcelain promotion. Customers received a discount on their Level porcelain and StoneWorks donated to Deep Well on their behalf.

1. A scenic view from the beach entrance at the Omni Resort Hilton Head as provided by Chris Webb.

2. Shauna Phillips captured the image on the water while fishing. 

3. Sunset on Broad Creek as photographed by Rebecca Shupp.

The 53rd annual RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing is set for April 12-18, with limited spectators on-site and strict health and safety protocols. COVID protocols include mandatory use of facial coverings and social distancing, according to a news release. 

The fan guide to safety policies for the 2021 event is listed at RBCHeritage.com/COVID19

Love is in the Air. Find the perfect present.

There are many podcasts and websites that offer audio stories that are entertaining and informative. Here are some kid-friendly online resources for (free) stories and top podcasts. 

WAHHI CELEBRATES 60 YEARS

For 60 years, the Women’s Association of Hilton Head has been connecting women throughout the Lowcountry. 

In preparation for the 60th anniversary celebration, there’s a lot to learn about WAHHI’s history and, more importantly, the association’s future plans. 

1. BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF HILTON HEAD NAMES NEW BOARD MEMBERS 

Jan Cooper, Lt. Andres F. Florencio and Carla Seebald are the newest Boys & Girls Club of Hilton Head board members. Cooper has had a successful career with Deloitte Touche in strategy and innovation, operations, and marketing. She has a passion for youth development and has experience with the United Way, Girl Scouts and other organizations. 

ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ IS ONE OF THE LOWCOUNTRY’S PREEMINENT FORAGERS 

Roberto Rodriguez is excited about his latest find. An expert forager, this native Argentinian has made countless discoveries while on one of his many treks through the forests of the Lowcountry. It’s usually the wood that calls to him; fallen limbs and trunks that he drags back to his shop and converts into beautiful works of art and furniture through his company, Wild Wood Rescue. 

Today, it’s a mushroom. Draped over the crook of a tree, it’s a vision of pure white, a mass of white shaggy fibers that resembles a furry hat. Its unique look is what lends it the name “Lion’s Mane.” 

1. SECOND HELPINGS NAMES NEW OFFICERS, ADDS NEW BOARD MEMBER 

New officers and a new board member assumed leadership roles for nonprofit Second Helpings. Margaret (Peg) Marty, a retired consumer banking executive who lives on Dataw Island, is board president. The officers for 2021 are Mary Ann Bell, Vice President (Indigo Run); Anthony Berkant, 

SALLIE ANN ROBINSON SHARES family food memoriesfamily memories

The coronavirus pandemic hasn’t slowed Sallie Ann Robinson down. Those who know her aren’t sure that anything could. 

With a tour company on Daufuskie Island, three Gullah cookbooks, a volume on Daufuskie history with Jenny Hersch and whispers of a Netflix special in the works, she doesn’t seem to have time to sleep. But she’s a woman on a mission, one who seems fueled by the efforts of her ancestors to treasure their remote island. 

CAHILL’S MARKET & CHICKEN KITCHEN SERVES UP A CENTURY’S WORTH OF BLUFFTON FARMING HISTORY 

John Cahill and his son Robbie, the produce and palette architects behind Cahill’s Market and Chicken Kitchen, know that when it comes to the successes of their now 17-year-old business, they owe all blessings to the land.

John’s grandmother bought the 200-acre parcel off May River Road in Bluffton in 1918 for $10,000; money obtained as the life insurance beneficiary after her brother died in World War I.

ATLAS SURVEYING AND ITS EVER-PRESENT ORANGE TRUCKS ENJOYS GROWTH 

As a professional land surveyor, Billy Gray was skilled at sizing up projects large and small — from farms to neighborhoods, and office buildings to shopping centers. 

But his business found its true direction when he took the measure of his leadership and corporate culture. 

What he determined, Gray says, was that his company needed to expand, and his management style needed to evolve to attract and retain top talent. 

KELLER WILLIAMS WELCOMES NEW AGENTS

Keller Williams Realty Lowcountry welcomes agents Stacha Stinson, Michelle Dugan, Kiana Collins, Anthony Lydon and Lena Sells to its Hilton Head office. Kelli Stevens, Erin McLemore, Linda Willis, and Maurice Greenleaf have joined the Beaufort office.  

REVITALIZE YOUR SPACE FOR THE SPRING SEASON

Preparing your patio or deck for the spring season is as important as attending to any room inside your home. Here are some tips to make your place special. 

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY WELCOMES 3 AGENTS, NAMES BROKER-IN-CHARGE

Piper Martel, Noel Turner and Roseann Tracy have joined the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Hilton Head Bluffton Realty real estate network.  

Martel, a Hilton Head native, specializes in working with first-time home buyers. She serves clients throughout the Hilton Head Island and Bluffton area.   

PLANNING A PERFECT REHEARSAL DINNER

In 2020 many engaged couples said “I do” to postponing their nuptials until 2021. Now that couples are revisiting their wedding plans, celebratory events like the rehearsal dinner are getting a COVID-friendly makeover.

“Now, venues that are doing events have had to start thinking outside of the box as to how they can safely host while protecting the guests and their staff,” said Beth Anderson, Director of Events for Sea Pines Country Club. “One such option is to have the event outside.”

REVAMPING YOUR PLANS DURING A PANDEMIC

What do you do when you’ve paid $60,000 for a wedding that’s supposed to take place in five days and a pandemic threatens to bring everything to a halt? 

Aimee Fennessey, local wedding planner and owner of Amanda Rose Weddings, says, “Modify!”

Bento Boxes. Tiny toasts. Custom sneakers.

As the saying goes: Necessity is the mother of invention.

Bridal trends for 2021 are no exception. Everything from crowd size to fashion choices reflects the aftermath of COVID-19’s appearance. Nevertheless, hope and flexibility have prevailed.